Distracted Driving: What is the 3-second rule?

FACT: Most crashes happen in about 3 seconds – not a lot of time to recognize and avoid a driving hazard. A car braking quickly in front of you, a child on a bike crossing your path, a truck spraying your windshield with rainwater or slush – they’re all unexpected and potentially dangerous…or even deadly. Experts have figured out what is going on in the mind of an experienced driver who has just identified a potential hazard. Broken down, it goes like this: The driver sees a hazard, identifies it as dangerous, scans his memory to figure out what to do about it, makes a decision to take an action, and then acts to avoid the hazard. All this has to happen in about 3 seconds. So if you are distracted by your phone or friends or are speeding, you might start this crash avoidance sequence too late. If you’ve never had experience with this type of situation, it might take you even longer to figure out what to do.

Distracted Driving: Sobering Facts

BTW: 5 seconds is the minimal amount of attention that a driver who texts takes away from the road. If traveling at 55 mph, this equals driving the length of a football field without looking at the road.

-Texting makes a crash up to 23 times more likely.

-Teens who text while driving spend 10% of the time outside their lane.

– 97% of teens agree that texting while driving is dangerous, yet 43% do it anyway.

-19% of drivers of all ages admit to surfing the web while driving.

https://goo.gl/TPpq7L

 

As a parent, you know one of the most dangerous and tempting distractions to teen drivers are cell phones. But did you know that talking and texting while behind the wheel can be deadly? About 1.2 million car crashes in 2013 involved drivers talking on phones, according to the National Safety Council, and at least 341,000 involved text messaging. Consider these other important texting and driving facts when discussing this crash risk with your new teen driver:

Teens have the reaction time of a 70-year-old when distracted while driving.

Crash risk is four times higher when a driver uses a cell phone, whether or not it’s hands-free.

Cell phone use behind the wheel reduces the amount of brain activity associated with driving by 37%.

The overwhelming majority (75%) of serious teen driver crashes are due to “critical errors,” with the three common errors accounting for nearly half of these crashes: 7
–lack of scanning that is needed to detect and respond to hazards
–going too fast for road conditions (e.g., driving too fast to respond to others or to successfully navigate a curve)
–being distracted by something inside or outside of the vehicle

 

Teen Driver Source:  https://goo.gl/aLzQHP

 

Verne Hill

Verne Hill

The News Guy – WBFJ Family Friendly Morning Show at WBFJ fm - Your family station!
I enjoy many things: Music. Family movie nights. My American flag flapping in the wind. Sunsets at the beach. Snow days. The Sweet Tea Party. Salvation through Grace…

VERSE: “Let everything that has breath praise the LORD” Psalm 150

QUOTE: “A person who loves his job, will never work a day in his life.”

MON-SAT 6A-10A(& Sunday@5 host)
verne@wbfj.fm
Verne Hill

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Verne Hill

I enjoy many things: Music. Family movie nights. My American flag flapping in the wind. Sunsets at the beach. Snow days. The Sweet Tea Party. Salvation through Grace… VERSE: “Let everything that has breath praise the LORD” Psalm 150 QUOTE: “A person who loves his job, will never work a day in his life.” MON-SAT 6A-10A (& Sunday@5 host) verne@wbfj.fm