Big announcement from Apple on Monday…Inventor of K-cup dissing product…Tropical paradise covered in snow? (FRI News)

Even Hawaii’s Mauna Kea Is Covered In Snow, Aka Winter May NEVER End

And you thought your snow day was bad.

Hawaii’s Mauna Kea awoke to a hefty blanket of white Thursday morning, after forecasters predicted 10 to 15 inches of snowfall overnight.

Officials closed the road to the volcano’s summit due to icy conditions — and while it’s not quite the island paradise we pictured, the scene is still spectacular in its own Hawaiian way.

 

It’s actually not abnormal for Hawaii to get snow, geology expert Ken Rubin told The Weather Channel. The state’s three tallest volcanoes — Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, and Haleakala — usually see snowfall a few times per year.

And yes, you can ski there.

There aren’t quite lifts, per se, but you can drive to the top of Mauna Kea volcano and shred your way down, backroads-style. This hobby isn’t advised during the current road closures, but it’s definitely a thing — just ask the Hawaii Ski Club.

In that case, we’ll settle for snow play. Aloha!

Apple

Apple has been lagging behind when it comes to creating a waterproof smartphone like Samsung and Sony have done in the past. 9to5Mac has flagged a new patent that shows Apple is indeed working on making a waterproof iPhone, but not in the way any other smartphone manufacturer has done before.

“Rather than make the casing waterproof, Apple’s patent describes a method of waterproofing internal components by integrating a hydrophobic coating with the electromagnetic interference shields used to protect sensitive electronics,” 9to5Mac explains. “This would be a better approach than waterproof casings, which can compromise the design of a phone.”

Although making a waterproof iPhone has never been one of Apple’s priorities, it is something that some Apple fans have said they’d like to see in the future. Right now there are several third-party cases you can buy to make your iPhone waterproof, as well as a crazy $30 spray that will do the same thing. However, none of these would be a substitute for an actual waterproof iPhone that you could dunk underwater without anything else added.

Interestingly, this patent comes at a time when Samsung just decided to ditch waterproofing as a key feature of its Galaxy S series of devices — unlike the Galaxy S5, you won’t be able to drop your Galaxy S6 into water and be confident it will survive.

 

 

Here’s How Much You’d Save by Dumping K-Cups for Traditional Brewed Coffee

The inventor of K-Cups says he regrets coming up with the idea and doesn’t even own a K-Cup machine.

 

This week, the Atlantic ran a story in which John Sylvan, inventor of the K-Cup—the single-serve coffee pods that are increasingly taking over home and office counter space—dropped a bombshell. “I don’t have one. They’re kind of expensive to use,” Sylvan said of the K-Cup system he created. “Plus it’s not like drip coffee is tough to make.”

This isn’t exactly like Henry Ford saying that he prefers bicycles to cars, or Steve Jobs praising the cost-effectiveness of a rotary phone over an iPhone, but it’s sorta in the same ballpark.

Sylvan acknowledged that he feels “bad sometimes” about creating the K-Cup, which he likened to “a cigarette for coffee, a single-serve delivery mechanism for an addictive substance.” Also, the proliferation of coffee pods—which are mostly unrecyclable, and which take up more and more space in landfills thanks to America’s ever-growing love affair with coffee—have raised serious environmental concerns as they’ve increased in popularity. Quartz declared them “the most wasteful form of coffee” on the planet.

For now, though, let’s focus strictly on the household economics of single-pod coffee brewers. To what degree are they “kind of expensive” compared with regular coffee makers?

First, there’s the cost of the machine. Recently, marketing professor Eric Anderson at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management noted that in 2002, the average coffee maker cost $35. Today it’s still easy to find a basic coffee maker for that price, or even $20 or $25. By 2013, however, the average coffee maker purchase price hit around $90, partly due to the spread of pricey single-pod brewers from Keurig (the K in K-Cups), Nespresso, and others. At Bed Bath and Beyond, the least expensive Keurig coffee maker is $100, which seems fairly typical.

But that’s only a small factor in how much more K-Cups cost compared with brewing traditional drip coffee. The Atlantic story estimates that the tiny amount of coffee used in each K-Cup winds up costing the equivalent of $40 per pound. That’s easily three times the price of a pound of ground or whole bean Starbucks coffee.

How much more money, then, does a household spend by using K-Cups? The answer depends on several factors, including how much coffee you drink and what kind, and how carefully you shop for deals on coffee makers and the coffee itself. Over the years, various penny-pinching individuals have done the math on the subject, and the breakdown usually shows that K-Cups cost two or three times more per cup compared with traditionally brewed coffee.

One fairly typical analysis, comparing Caribou brand K-Cups versus ground coffee, showed that the per-cup cost was 66¢ versus 28¢, respectively. If you make three cups a day, 365 days a year, that adds up to around $723 spent on K-Cups, versus $307 for regular coffee brewers. So you’d easily save $400 a year by going the old-fashioned route—which, again, Sylvan points out accurately, ain’t exactly hard to handle.

For an idea of how much your household specifically would save—or, on the flip side, how much you’re paying for the convenience of K-Cups—check out the coffee maker calculator one economist created a couple years back. Enter a few data points into the Excel calculator, including how many cups of coffee you brew per week, the cost of coffee machines you’re considering, how much you typically spend on coffee, and even how much of the coffee pot you usually wind up pouring down the drain, and it’ll spit out the per-cup price breakdowns. We entered several different scenarios, and K-Cups were at least twice as expensive in all cases.

If the majority of your coffee does come brewed via K-Cup, at least you can take solace in the fact that you’re not hitting Starbucks or another coffee shop several times a day. Compared to that, your K-Cup habit will seem downright cheap.

 

Verne Hill

Verne Hill

The News Guy – WBFJ Family Friendly Morning Show at WBFJ fm - Your family station!
I enjoy many things: Music. Family movie nights. My American flag flapping in the wind. Sunsets at the beach. Snow days. The Sweet Tea Party. Salvation through Grace…

VERSE: “Let everything that has breath praise the LORD” Psalm 150

QUOTE: “A person who loves his job, will never work a day in his life.”

MON-SAT 6A-10A(& Sunday@5 host)
verne@wbfj.fm
Verne Hill


Verne Hill

I enjoy many things: Music. Family movie nights. My American flag flapping in the wind. Sunsets at the beach. Snow days. The Sweet Tea Party. Salvation through Grace… VERSE: “Let everything that has breath praise the LORD” Psalm 150 QUOTE: “A person who loves his job, will never work a day in his life.” MON-SAT 6A-10A (& Sunday@5 host) verne@wbfj.fm